welcome and enjoy!

Hi and welcome to my blog about comics from other people’s childhood! It is dedicated primarily to British humour comics of the 60s and 70s. The reason they are not from my childhood is simply because I didn’t live in the UK back then (nor do I live there now). I knew next to nothing about them until fairly recently but since then I’ve developed a strong liking for the medium and amassed a large collection, including a number of complete or near complete sets. My intention is to use this blog as a channel for sharing my humble knowledge about different titles, favourite characters and creators as I slowly research my collection.

QUICK TIP: this blog is a sequence of posts covering one particular comic at a time. The sequence follows a certain logic, so for maximum results it is recommended that the blog is read from the oldest post up.

Copyright of all images and quotations used here is with their respective owners. Any such copyrighted material is used exclusively for educational purposes and will be removed at first notice. All other text copyright Irmantas P.



Showing posts with label Original artwork. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Original artwork. Show all posts

Friday, May 26, 2017

REJECTED WORLD-WIDE WEIRDIES BY KEN REID



In my previous post I showed a Creepy Creation by Ken Reid that was for some reason rejected by the editor of SHIVER AND SHAKE comic.

When SHIVER AND SHAKE was absorbed by WHOOPEE! in 1974, Ken was put in charge of drawing the World-Wide Weirdies feature.  The complete WWWs series in the weeklies consists of 203 illustrated posters, all drawn and quite a few signed by Ken Reid.

Interestingly, there were three more that were rejected. The School of 'Wails' printed in WHOOPEE! dated 23rd April, 1977 was first submitted as Wales (Miners); the title suggests that Ken chose the mining angle for his original version but it was a sensitive theme in the 70s so IPC preferred to play it safe and instructed him to take a different approach and exploit the wails/whales wordplay instead (my speculation). 

Then there was something about Ken’s Weird/Whacky Whirlpool that the editor didn’t like so readers only saw the second re-drawn version in WHOOPEE! issue dated 17th December, 1977.

Lastly, the Tower of London which Ken posted drew in November 1977 would have been a welcome addition to the gallery of London attractions but IPC rejected Ken’s take on it without suggesting how to make it acceptable.

I haven’t seen the first two rejects but the original of the last one has survived in Ken’s archive. Again, I can’t quite understand the editor’s reasons for rejecting it. Any thoughts on this?



Wednesday, May 17, 2017

REJECTED CREEPY CREATION BY KEN REID



Ken Reid fans will certainly know that Creepy Creations was a series of single-panel illustrations that he drew for SHIVER AND SHAKE comic. Some were excellent, some less so, but for some reason the Editor rejected the one shown in the picture below. I don’t quite see a reason for rejecting it, but perhaps I am missing something?... 


Sunday, August 30, 2015

WHO WAS THE ORIGINAL FRANKIE STEIN?



In his interview for Golden Fun magazine Ken Reid said he developed the character of Frankie Stein from an idea suggested by Wham! Editor Alf Wallace.

Initially Ken didn’t name the friendly monster Frankie Stein, and the reasons are quite clear: in the classic story Victor Frankenstein was the creator while the result of his experiment was the Frankenstein monster. Following the scenario, Frankie Stein should have been the inventor, not the monster, and Ken’s original plan was to keep it that way: this early pencil sketch tells us that he considered the name of Frankie Stein for another character:


Had he stuck to the original idea, one of the long running characters in British comics would have been known by another name (Ken had a shortlist of four), likewise his neurotic parent, but that’s another story that I will save for later.

Saturday, August 15, 2015

ATTENTION, SPARKY PEOPLE!



As a special treat, today I offer you a look at Bill Ritchie’s first drafts of what later became front covers of the first two Sparky annuals. I photographed them during a recent visit to my mate Peter whose collection of UK comics, free gifts, original artwork, etc. is by far the biggest in the World.

I’ve placed the paintings side-by-side with the actual covers, spot-the-difference puzzle style. In reality, they are approx. twice the size of the printed versions. Enjoy!


 

Monday, July 28, 2014

SOME SKETCHES BY KEN REID ON EBAY


I will take a short break from Frankie Stein and Monster Fun Comic and show something else instead. It is not very often that one gets to see original Ken Reid artwork offered on eBay and last week fans had one of those rare opportunities, actually, two of them. Two pages of sketches were up for auction. I can recognise Big Head and Thick Head as well as Jonah’s sister Jinx in the first one, so it must be from 1963 or 1964. The page with artwork on both sides sold for £108.23:




Fudge the Elf is the centre-figure of the second page which was offered in a separate auction. I think I can also recongise a policeman and a thief from Ali-Ha-Ha and the 40 Thieves. I will take a guess that the page is from the early 60s before Ken had given up drawing Fudge the Elf for Manchester Evening News. There is also a possibility that the page is from a later period, perhaps 1963, after Ken recovered from his nervous breakdown. If that’s the case, the artist probably sketched Fudge the Elf for his own pleasure, reminiscing about the character that he had created and drawn for so many years. Oh, and isn’t that Ken Reid’s self-portrait on the other side? The page sold for £173.00: